logo

Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Options
View
Go to last post Go to first unread
Offline vbwyrde  
#1 Posted : Sunday, June 22, 2014 12:07:22 PM(UTC)
vbwyrde

Rank: Administration

Groups: Administrators, Registered
Joined: 4/18/2014(UTC)
Posts: 312
Man
United States

Generally I prefer to run a Sandbox Campaign supplemented with Spiral Method. I don't ever decide the ending of my story at the beginning of my campaign design. Period. In fact that is completely antithetical to my wishes as I much prefer the Players to decide the plot via the interactions of their Characters with the NPCs and events inherent in the Back Story... should they choose to do so. I'm fine with them leaving the Back Story and heading off into the hills as well. I studiously avoid making a preference in my mind for the finale. I prefer to give Players the Agency to manage for themselves what their Characters do. I set up a back story that runs on it's own and only changes if the Player Characters themselves alter circumstances in a way that changes the principal NPCs plans. This usually requires a certain amount of effort on the Player Character's parts. The Spiral Method gets mixed in with this in order to spice things up with semi-random and random encounters and/or sub plots. I tie up loose ends along the way by reintroducing hanging threads over the course of the Campaign (I keep of list of 'lost threads'). I've been GMing this way for about 30 years now, and it has so far worked quite well for me. I don't recall any of my many players expressing anything other than a high level of sanctification with this methodology.

My view is that there is no "one true way" to do plot development for RPGs. There are different styles and methods for different players and GMs and it's all based on game style preferences, of which there are myriads.

REF: Original Post to Gamesmasters Academy on Roll20
Offline vbwyrde  
#2 Posted : Monday, August 4, 2014 9:33:09 PM(UTC)
vbwyrde

Rank: Administration

Groups: Administrators, Registered
Joined: 4/18/2014(UTC)
Posts: 312
Man
United States

  • Start with a Map.
  • In various places on the map outline groups of people, adversaries and terrain that are challenges. These can be towns, or swamps, or hives of bees. Whatever works for the world.
  • In each of the main places create a few Top-Dog NPCs, and decide what they're like and what their doing, who they're working with, and who their opponents are. Add some history.
  • Ok. Ready to start.

Edited by user Monday, August 4, 2014 9:33:53 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Minor edit.

Offline thegrimjester  
#3 Posted : Thursday, August 7, 2014 1:48:26 AM(UTC)
thegrimjester

Rank: Newbie

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/1/2014(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Yonkers

For a general overview, I really like this. People and places are the focus of any role-playing game. I think special objects might have a place here too, but they're definitely not mandatory.

Although I appreciate a good location, as a GM, I try to make my challenges character based because they're mobile. Also, they can direct/lead the players to interesting locations. If you create a challenge based on a location, you run the risk of the players missing, or avoiding the location altogether.

To add more detail to this, I also like to craft adventures based on one, or more, of my player characters' backgrounds. This helps establish a motivation for the player to engage in an adventure.
Offline vbwyrde  
#4 Posted : Friday, August 8, 2014 10:42:54 PM(UTC)
vbwyrde

Rank: Administration

Groups: Administrators, Registered
Joined: 4/18/2014(UTC)
Posts: 312
Man
United States

Originally Posted by: thegrimjester Go to Quoted Post
For a general overview, I really like this. People and places are the focus of any role-playing game. I think special objects might have a place here too, but they're definitely not mandatory.

Although I appreciate a good location, as a GM, I try to make my challenges character based because they're mobile. Also, they can direct/lead the players to interesting locations. If you create a challenge based on a location, you run the risk of the players missing, or avoiding the location altogether.

To add more detail to this, I also like to craft adventures based on one, or more, of my player characters' backgrounds. This helps establish a motivation for the player to engage in an adventure.


The Spiral Method is a helpful concept here. I like terrain based adventures sometimes as it gives the players a tactical aspect to work on, which can be fun. The enemy is roosted up on the rocks above the road. A narrow pass leads there, but only one person can make it up at a time. ... that sort of challenge can be really interesting. The way to get around it being missed by the players is simply to have it as a free floating Scene that has that terrain... which can be moved to wherever the players happen to go. That's the Spiral Method in a nutshell. Disconnect your Scenes from time and place. Use them as needed. Works nicely.

I totally agree about basing adventures on PC backgrounds as well. Yup. Works wonders. :)

Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF 2.1.1 | YAF © 2003-2019, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.338 seconds.